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, this time at reactor number 4. martha: the u.s. officials say the next 28-48 hours are critical in stopping and cooling down what's going on inside these reactors. if it doesn't happen, this area could be deadly for many years to come. good morning julian. tell me what the latest is from where you are. >> reporter: i think have much the efforts today to put cold water on the reactors has failed. the helicopters have only marginally put as much water as they wanted to on the reactors. it doesn't seem to be having a regular effect. all hopes rest with the crews trying to link up the electricity line back into the plant that will then allow them to restart the generators which automatically pump cold water onto these heated up reactors and bring temperatures down. all other efforts seem to have failed. the attempt to use fire engines to pump cold water on the reactors has failed. they are look at a single solution now. martha: it sounds like it's up to these people known as the fukushima 50, 180 workers rotating in and out of the plant to limit their own exposure to the radiation. what a coura
are tracking severe weather that is making its way across the southeastern u.s. it's already killed one person and injured a dozen in louisiana. >>> a peaceful protest in the ivory coast. one moment a blood bath. just seconds later and you'll see the entire scene as it played out. women gunned down in the streets. the shooters, the government security forces. >>> a new development in the ongoing drama that is charlie sheen. he is taking your questions live. we'll tell you about that. >>> plus the ipad getting competition from blackberry. we're taking apart the playbook and looking at the ipad 2 headed to stores less than a year after its predecessor. i'm don lemon at the cnn world headquarters in atlanta. a lot of news to get to right now. we start in north africa. u.s. military planes are now assisting people who have been stuck in tunisia after fleeing neighboring libya because of ongoing violence. more than 130 egyptian refugees today lifted to cairo aboard two planes. inside libya forces say they repelled pro gadhafi trims attempted to take the city of zawia near tripoli. a look how the u.
of people in london. dozens of u.s. allies that at least one libyan opposition leader. she discussed the coalition's goals for ending the not war. >> to urge qaddafi to implement a real cease-fire that is not going to be immediately breached by his own forces. to withdraw from those areas that he has taken by force. and to look for a political resolution which could include his leaving the country. >> shepard: this comes as a senior u.s. officials tells fox news that qaddafi's inner circle shows signs of, quote, cracking with some of his most trusted advisors questioning whether he can survive. that official also tells us that morale among the libyan troops is low. but the situation on the ground in the not war does not reflect that over the past 24 hours, colonel qaddafi's forces have made significant gains against the rebel fighters. those rebels advanced quickly over the last couple days qaddafi's hometown of sirte. rockets forced them to double back today, retreat. this despite the coalition firing 22 tomahawk missiles at a cost of $33 million. and flying more than 100 air strike
, and the u.s. are scrambling to enforce a no-fly zone over libya now that the u.n. security council has authorized all necessary measures. cnn international correspondent nic robertson is live in tripoli. good morning, nic. >> reporter: good morning, christine. well, we've already heard from the deputy foreign minister here who says he doesn't expect immediate air strikes here, but wouldn't say what preparations the army or anyone else in the country may be taking to defend the country with this new u.n. resolution. when he was asked about the cease-fire that the resolution calls for, he seemed to indicate that the government here was going to take some time to do that. they didn't have anyone to negotiate with that they would put it in place. but this was something that was going to take time. seemed to hint that the army here may plan to continue with some of its offensive. that offensive was going on in the east, and we have no updated information from that front line this morning, christine. >> does this u.n. resolution paint -- does it paint them into a corner, gadhafi and his alli
are found in tokyo's water supply, as the u.s. bans the import of some japanese foods. >> right there. right there! >> and too close for comfort. a kayaker in florida meets a >> and too close for comfort. a kayaker in florida meets a monster of the deep. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody. thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. we will not surrender. those words, the defiant libyan leader moammar gadhafi, who made his first public appearance in a week. despite the allied-imposed no-fly zone, libyan troops continued their unrelenting attacks against rebel-held cities where conditions are described as desperate. the u.s. military says it is considering all options. explosions were heard in tripoli this morning. and susan mcginnis is in washington with more on this story. good morning, susan. >> hi, good morning, betty. the mission in libya is accomplishing its goal, including grounding gadhafi's air force. but as criticism of the operation grows, along with the cost, the u.s. is looking to hand off control. despite a fourth night of allied air strikes pounding libya, leader
>>> rebel retreat. libyan troops have opposition forces on the run. but for how long? as the u.s. considers arming the insurgency. >>> cajun cleanup. a powerful storm rolls through louisiana, threatening the southeast with flooding and high winds. >>> and union fight. ohio can vote on limiting collective bargaining rights, as the battle in wisconsin goes to collective bargaining rights, as the battle in wisconsin goes to court. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody. thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. this morning, the back and forth fighting in libya has turned against the rebel troops. opposition forces are on the run, fleeing the latest government counterattack. the rebels were trying to advance on moammar gadhafi's hometown of sirte. they've also had to leave two critical oil ports, brega and ras lanuf. the u.s. navy launched a new barrage of cruise missiles at targets near tripoli and nato takes command of the operation today. joel brown is in washington with more. good morning, joel. what's the latest? >> betty, it wasn't even a close fight. gadhafi forc
>> couric: tonight, the u.s. uses a warplane as the allies keep up the assault on libya and qaddafi remains defiant. >> (translated): we win. we will be victorious in this historical battle. we will not surrender. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, they survived one disaster, now these japanese have been forced to take shelter against another threat-- nuclear radiation. america's nuclear problem. where to store permanently more than 145 million pounds of spent fuel rods. and college students struggling to make the grade. what some schools are doing to make sure they graduate. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. it's four days into a u.s.-led assault on his military, and libya's moammar qaddafi has lost radar installations, tanks, and naval facilities but not his defiance. he appeared in public tonight in tripoli vowing to fight on and telling supporters he will win and will not surrendered. qaddafi's forces kept up their attacks on civilians today in a n
to see you on this monday. i'm terrell brown in for betty nguyen. the pentagon says the u.s.-led air assault on libya has been very effective, inflicting heavy damage on government forces. the air strikes included over 120 cruise missiles, bt bombers and jet fighters. one of moammar gadhafi's compounds in tripoli was hit. but u.s. officials say gadhafi is not a target. the libyan dictator promises a long, hard war. susan mcginnis is in washington with more. susan, good morning to you. >> hi, good morning, terrell. after a weekend of heavy air strikes on libya, the main issue in washington is, where to go from here. u.s. officials are now planning a more limited role for u.s. forces going forward. u.s. officials are not planning to lead the mission in libya much longer. >> we expected in a matter of days to be able to turn over the primary responsibility to others. >> reporter: following a weekend of missile strikes and air patrols, defense secretary robert gates said the pentagon will soon hand over the reins to either the french and british, or to nato. his comments came as american
morning, joel. yeah, washington is watching higher oil prices, and considering u.s. dependence on foreign oil, it's now looking at a much closer alternative. the white house is considering tapping the nation's oil reserves to try to put a cap on runaway oil prices. >> all matters have to be on the table when you go through -- when you see the difficulty coming out of the economic crisis we're in, and the fragility of it. >> reporter: the strategic petroleum reserves, the u.s. government's emergency oil supply, holds 727 million barrels right now. that's enough to provide the nation the oil it needs for a couple of months. after hurricane katrina, the government released 30 million barrels. oil prices dropped nearly 4%. during the first gulf war, 34 million barrels were released and prices dropped a third in one day. but the price of gasoline up 33 cents a gallon in the past two weeks, drivers will take any break they can get. >> i used to make it three, four days with $75 of gas. now every two days i've got to put $75 in this car. so, you know, it's ridiculous. >> as a student it's kind o
, not only in the u.s. but throughout asia, africa, and south america that are all contributing to higher crude oil prices and consequently higher gasoline prices at the pump. >> reporter: those higher gas prices came as many were starting to feel better about the economy, but now any extra cash may be going right into the the tank. >> i think it's crazy. >> reporter: jason king spends $40 more a month on gas. >> pretty soon i'm going to have to start thinking about riding a bike or other means of transportation, definitely. >> reporter: in fact, those skyrocketing prices have some giving up the road for the rails. metro use in los angeles, up 10%. and across the country commuters are using the latest technology, smartphone apps and social media, to find the cheapest gas, anything to save a buck. >> everybody i know is trying to carpool and fill up the car as much as possible. >> reporter: gas prices hit a high in february, but in the weeks ahead spring is when prices typically rise the most. miguel almaguer, nbc news, los angeles. >> and as we mentioned at the top of the newscast, the ob
, the dangers of u.s. military involvement, while already fighting two other wars, and the precedent this may set in other nations. and the fact that this may not go quite as the u.s. and nato have planned. notably, as you're about to hear, the president left open the possibility of arming the rebels who are in the fight against gadhafi in libya. and here now a portion of our conversation with the president at this time of high stakes overseas. the moment your speech ended last night, the associated press put out an item that read, president obama's speech was about defending the first war launched on his watch. how does it end? >> well, first of all, i think it's important to note that we've had two wars on my watch. one which we've wound down and we do not have combat operations in iraq any more. afghanistan, obviously, is still a tough fight. and that weighs heavily on me in making these decisions. but what was clear to me was we had a unique circumstance to save a lot of lives in this libyan situation. and that we had an international mandate to do it, and an international coalition that
. >> this morning, 600 americans are stuck north of sendai amid the worst devastation. the u.s. is sending in buses to get them. >> we are bringing all available resources to bear to closely monitor the situation and to protect american citizens who may be in harm's way. >> not much has changed at the nuclear plant. experts think it could take weeks to get the situation under control. much of our information about radiation is coming from the japanese, so the u.s. is now starting to collect its own data. >> when the united states says evacuate out to 50 miles, there is a real sound reason for that. >> but they stress no one in the u.s. should be worried. >> basic physics and basic science tells us that there really can't be any risk or harm to anyone here in the united states. >> the military says few americans have boarded government-run flights out ofjapan. those who are coming home are being tested. >> we are doing screening of passengers and/or cargo if there happens to be even a blip in terms of radiation. >> and the fallout here at home. general motors is shutting down a louisiana assembly pl
of supporters in tripoli, vowing to be victorious in the end. the u.s. lost a jet there today, an older fighter jet, mechanical failure they say, and not a shootdown. both pilots are okay. but it could have ended much differently. and in the beginning stages still of this so far u.s.-led attack, a lot of people are wondering how this ends. we begin tonight with our pentagon correspondent jim miklaszewski. jim, good evening? >> reporter: good evening, brian. for american air crews, this is about as tense as it gets. and it took more than 12 hours to safely recover both of the downed airmen. what's left of the american fighter jet was scattered across the libyan desert. the air force f-15 was on a bombing mission when it developed engine trouble. the two americans ejected as the plane went down. two marine harrier jets soon located the downed pilot not far from the wreckage, and he was flown to safety. in the process, marine officials say one of the jets dropped two bombs. another may have strafed the area with gunfire. six civilians were wounded but surprisingly bore no grudge against the americ
of course sending a massive amount of aid and the u.s. military. the u.s.s. ronald reagan, the carrier strike group has an aircraft carrier and a number of united states ships there assisting in the rescue efforts as well as using-- we saw this in hurricane katrina, of course, the military and coast card using the massive ships as basically floating hospitals where they have fresh water and dave you pointed out earlier, the des desalization process. >> and that's vital and 70 countries offered aid including china which is interesting because they've been very contentious for years and years, especially in the last couple, over an incident that international waters in japan, and we won't get into the particulars, however, china came to their aid and offered condolences, offered money and as we've pointed out, the united states appears to be leading the way and we're supposed to check in with the 7th fleet of the navy later on this morning what they're doing to help. >> alisyn: you can see already, food ap supplies are distributed by our military and meanwhile, satellite photos are just
will lead the operation when the u.s. steps back in the days ahead, though nato is expected to play a major role. meanwhile, a u.s. air force fighter jet crashed today in eastern libya. the two men on board ejected and were rescued. a cbs news poll out tonight finds most americans are following the events in libya closely and nearly seven out of ten approve of the air strikes. mandy clark begins our coverage from the scene of that fighter jet crash. >> reporter: this is all that remains of the american f-15e that went down last night. a steady stream of people came to have a look. saleh saeed saleh, a local farmer, was eager to show us the wreckage. when it it this ground he says it sounded like a rocket exploding. he thought qaddafi's forces were on the attack. officials say the fighter jet crashed because of a mechanical error rather than any enemy fire. it landed east of benghazi which is in the heart of rebel territory. the jet's crew ejected safely. were they okay? were they injured? "the person i saw had minor injuries, just scratches" he says. one of the americans landed in a nearby
on the radicalization of muslims in the u.s., but is it a matter of national security, or a u.s., but is it a matter of national security, or a witch-hunt? captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody, and thanks for joining us, i'm betty nguyen. >>> the three-week budget battle in wisconsin that has made national headlines appears to be over. it ended swiftly and unexpectedly. republican members of the state senate outmaneuvered their absentee democratic colleagues to pass a bill which sharply limits union rights. >> this is a violation of law. >> the vote caught almost everyone by surprise. by 18-1 the state senate passed a measure stripping collective bargaining rights from most of wisconsin's public employees, handing governor scott walker a stunning victory in the three-week labor standoff. in a statement he applauded lawmakers for taking, quote, a step in the right direction to balance the budget, and reform government. senate democrats had fled the state to avoid any votes, but republicans found a way to push the measure through. they removed all elements of the bill that involved bud
: president obama gets the u.s. military involved in the libya situation and tells gaddafi he must go. we'll look at the citizen soldiers trying to hold off the libyan army. what last year's oil spill is still doing to the gulf coast. live from the studio in washington, this is "special report." good evening. i'm bret baier. president obama again called on libyan leader muammar gaddafi to step down. on the ground in libya, mutenist army unit helping to secure a key oil instalelation after rebels repelled attack from gaddafi loyalist. they ruled out any negotiations with gaddafi and the international criminal court said they will investigate gaddafi and his sons for possible crimes against humanity. we begin coverage with white house correspondent mike emanuel. >> reporter: as liberal forces fight the regime at strategic joint conference, at news conference with mexican president felipe calderon, president obama called out the libyan leader by name, a new approach. >> let me be very unambiguous about this. colonel gaddafi needs to step down from power and leave. that is good for his countr
. phoenix, arizona on our line for republicans. what should the president say on the u.s. involvement in libya on monday? caller: if he's the intelligent president i want him to tell us why we're going into libya and not the sudan and not bahrain. i think it's un:tionable to open another front when we're spending millions a day on iraq and afghanistan and 50% of our revenue goes to defense. host: the sudan would be another front, too. caller: we could help solve that with humanitarian aid. with the cost in fossil fuels, if we paid the actual cost that fossil fuels cost us, we would pay $12.50 a gallon for gasoline because these wars are about oil. what i'm saying is if he's the innocent president then why doesn't he talk about -- intelligent president why doesn't he talk about the bahrain or sudan? he's doing it for oil just like the last -- just like the iraq war. and i think we need to question why we're doing these things. if we want to help people resisting and trying for democracy, let's do that. but let's not be hidden about our agenda.
the opportunity to do that in a way that u.s. presidents usually do. president obama taking all sorts of criticism from the right for not cancelling his trade visit to latin america as a result of this military action in libya. the white house knew that criticism would come. their decision to go ahead with the trip and forego the chest-thumping commander in chief theater at the start of a military convention, that is a fascinating and blunt demonstration of how much this presidency is not like that of george w. bush. do you remember when george w. bush campaigned for president by saying he wanted america to have a humble foreign policy? candidates for president love to say stuff like that. >> i don't think it's a role of the united states to walk into a country and say we do it this way, so should you. >> the united states must be humble and proud of our values, but humble in figure out how to chart their course. >> candidates say stuff like that when they are running because americans like that idea. americans like to vote for the idea. we like that kind of talk and we expect it from candidates.
to see if helicopters could use buckets to bump water on the reactors. the u.s. is now telling the u.s. citizens living within 50 miles of the plant to evacuate. radiation levels have risen. officials say it is not enough to be dangerous. but many people are avoiding the city. >> reporter: at the united nations, the security council held a moment of silence for the victims in japan. the u.n. is helping to coordinate relief efforts, sending in aid from around the world. >> reporter: in the town of ofanatu, british and american crews are searching for survivors. >> we're trying to access underneath. but obviously, you can see very, very difficult conditions. >> reporter: crews continue to recover bodies from the wreckage. many times, family members are there, to mourn their loved ones. randall pink ston, wjz -- pinkston, wjz eyewitness news. >> there are reports that all of the water is gone from the troubled nuclear power plant. that increases the risk of the rods melting down. let's take a look. stocks open low and drop sharply in the afternoon. here's a look at the numbers just moment
as egyptian president has now resigned. one of the u.s. airmen wounded in wednesday's attack at a german airport remains in critical condition tonight. two airmen were killed. a fourth sustained injuries not believed to be life threatening. national correspondent catherine herridge reports on what we know and what we don't know about the suspect. >> reporter: this picture of arif uka comes from social networking site where he wrote about the holy war and the unbeliever. german officials say uka confessed to the shooting at the frankfurt airport on wednesday that left two dead and two others wounded. the evidence so far points to a single gunman, does it amount to act of terrorism? the question was put to the state department spokesman. >> it's not a terrorist? attack? can you make it clear? >> was the shooting of congresswoman gabrielle giffords a terrorist attack? i mean, you have to look at the evidence and look at the motivation and then you make a judgment. >> reporter: a day earlier while intelligence reports were circulating that the gunman shouted "god is great" as he opened fire,
information here. this is tape up from not too long ago. the u.s. house of representatives has just voted to pass the bill to defund national public radio, npr. the final tally was 228 yeas, 192 nays. so the u.s. house officially has spoken. >>> not too far away from capitol hill it, live pictures at the white house. we're waiting here. any minute the president will be speaking in the rose garden. we're told this was announced just today. he'll be making some sort of brief comment and specifically about japan. we don't know yet fell offer up a little time on the back end to take questions from some of those white house corps reporters. dan lothian is standing by for me as is gloria borger. standing by, as well. dan, let's first set the scene here. i mean, we have just found out today that the president would be speaking. what will do you know about what he may say and also talk about what he's just done this afternoon with regard to the japanese embassy. >> that's right. that's the hint perhaps as to what the president will say when he made that visit unexpected, a stop the an the japanes
on rebels this hour. new targets, more carnage and the intense pressure for u.s. military action. >>> also, the crisis that libya keeps pushing up gas prices across the country. that's creating more economic misery here at home, and new political danger for president obama. plus, protesters warn the u.s. congress may, may be on the brink of stoking new violence against muslims. anger and anticipation are building before controversial hearings this week on islamic extremism in america. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." libya centering the fourth week of what's now a full-fledged civil war. moammar gadhafi's forces are claiming new gains in their pounding of rebel-held cities. gadhafi maintaining a tight grip on the capital of tripoli, and the opposition appears to be holding out to benghazi in the east, but there are conflicting reports about who is in control of several other key cities, where fierce, fierce battles have been raging now for days. diplomatic sources at the united nations say the united states is working with france and britain on draft resolution on libya, a
is a partial meltdown at two separate reactors. there is a lot being written here about the u.s. nuclear program as well. a headline in "the washington post." "safety concerns continue to hinder the sector." we wanted to rescue a bit more about this this morning. this is making most of the headlines at this point. what should the effect be a hone u.s. nuclear program? for republicans, 202-737-0001. for democrats, 202-737-0002. for independents, 202-628-0205. we will get to your calls in a couple of minutes. jonathan sobel is online with us. paint a picture of japan. caller: i am supposed to -- i suppose that we will start with the nuclear situation. they have started to pour see water on the nuclear reactors to cool them down. remember, there was a dramatic explosion yesterday from hydrogen building up in the first one. >> talk to us about the concerns -- host: talk to us about the concerns. caller: we are getting regular updates from outside the plant. they are peaking as the authorities from inside the vent steam from inside the reactor. it is not clear how long they're staying at elev
now in the murder of two u.s. air men, the gunman confessing to targeting the u.s. military, saying he acted alone, opening fire inside of a u.s. military bust in germany. good morning, everybody the we're sorting through all this again today. i'm bill hemmer. welcome to "america's newsroom" and welcome to arthel neville, nice to see you today. arthel: nice to see you as well, in for martha maccallum. a 20-year-old ethnic albainan from kosovo, we're told he was radicalized over the past few weeks. bill: reportedly yelling "god is great" in arabic before starting with the gun fire. >> reporter: we don't have the identities of the air men killed or wounded, one said to be in critical condition at a hospital in frankfurt right now. it's really difficult to believe that this man, this shooter, who has confessed to killing the two air men was radicalized in the last few weeks, but that is what germany's interior minister is saying. family members who have been interviewed about the suspect, arid uka, say he was a tkwout muslim but that the whole family was extremely proamerican. they live i
in a u.s.-friendly area, luckily for two pilots who successfully parachuted from that plane after it crashed. it was completely destroyed. two pilots landing in a field and were picked up by local rebels forces and were brought to a safe place where they are now in u.s. hands. ajdabiya is a town that we're talking more and more about, it's becoming the battlefield for the future of the country. it remains in gadhafi hands. the rebels are on the outskirts of that town in the east. they have tried on a number of occasions to penetrate the town. they've been pushed back each time by pro-gadhafi forces. rebels have pleaded for more air strikes to do the job. there have been a number of coalition strikes but not enough so far to seriously degrade the pro-gadhafi forces. on misrata, another town active today, like yesterday, and the day before, held by rebels still. the pro-gadhafi forces went in with tanks, artillery, snipers, nine more killed there. the no-fly zone active in the east has yet to become as active in places in the west like over misrata. gadhafi and his forces are trying
the equivalent of the pentagon. in the war against iraq, the u.s. war was committed from a headquarters in florida. they have a communications established with the commanders in the region in on the ground. host: what does it mean for the united states? guest: the and that is this is trying to hand off responsibility for the mission as quickly as possible. they wanted to do the things that only the united states could do, provide rapid command- and-control structure to get the operation going rapidly and effectively. and then to use the u.s. military firepower to destroy and dismantle gaddafi's command- and-control systems and particularly his surface to air missile capability. that is very important because no one -- everyone wants to minimize the danger to pilots enforcing the no-fly zone, and taking out those missile sites becomes very important to enable that. but that is the initial phase. that is starting to wind down if you look at the number of targets, the number of sites already it, i think this operation has been designed so that the u.s. could do the thing that the unit -- t
in the u.s. customers can expect better coverage. and also fewer pricing plans. >> let's hope. >> let's hope so. >>> here's your monday forecast, everybody. have some heavy rain in southern california. showers in san francisco, portland and seattle. another 2 feet of snow in the sierra range and a foot in the southern rockies. showers from the upper midwest to the ohio valley. a wintry mix in northern new england and rain here in new york and in philly. >>> 70s from dallas and miami. 64 in omaha. 60s from billings to salt lake city. near 70 in phoenix. >>> well, it was a stunning close encounter that was simply out of this world. >> pretty cool. i don't know if anybody saw this around here. take a look at this. it looked to the heavens saturday night. you were probably treated to a full moon like none other. scientists call this a super moon because it came so close to the earth. the closest it's come in nearly two decades. >> after the super moon rose in the east it appeared 14% larger and 30% brighter than a regular full moon. you said your dad is really into astrono astrono astrono
a city under siege for days, but a senior defense official confirms that u.s. fighter jets carried out strikes on targets, including tanks. and a doctor inside the city says the tanks that were not hit have left. still the pentagon reports there is no intelligence that indicates qaddafi's forces are actually abandoning either misurata or the city of ajdabiya. it is so-called gateway to the east in libya. people there say rebels have been holding the city center but qaddafi's troops are packed all around the outskirts. but just to the north of rebel strong hold of benghazi, it's a far different reality. [chanting] >> shepard: there, the troops are rallying speart of the coalition. and all of those still suffering around libya. team fox coverage of our waziristan -- wars around the world. jennifer griffin at the pentagon. first steve harrigan streaming live from the capital city tonight. you have been hearing new explosions there, it's my understanding, steve? >> that's right, shepard. we thought the pace might slow down on night five of these attacks but anything but. we have heard mult
in tripoli. a u.s. official tells cnn the protesters are well armed and could carry on the fight for some time. that means tanks and antiaircraft guns. >> what war? what war? then we will die. >> everybody using guns before the people. anybody makes a small move, they kill them. >> the heavy fighting caused them to flee for the border. it's causing a humanitarian crisis. many are in tent cities in the tunisian border. police arrived yesterday to try to help the situation. let's get back to tripoli. it's the stronghold and the scene for the fiercest battles we have seen. cnn international correspondent knick robertson joins me. good morning to you. you spoke with gadhafi's son late last night. does he think his father still has control of the country? >> reporter: he thinks his father has control and is going to hold on. the objective is for the army to take complete control before they get into any political reforms and steps to meet the demands of the armed opposition. what's happening 40 miles from here he said is hugely important. it's important because it's going to stronghold rebels
victories, but there's growing concern in the u.s. about who the opposition really is and if they could actually be worse than moammar gadhafi. >>> in the u.s., several states inundated with floodwaters are about to get hit again. we'll tell you just how bad it is going to get. >>> and saving big bucks with online coupons. yes, now we have your interest. we'll show you how to cash in. >>> we begin with a story that has an impact on every household in america. soaring gas prices. the unrest in libya is helping fuel that surge. since yesterday, you're paying on average two cents more for a gallon of regular unleaded. the national average, $3.49. and this is going to shock you. this time last year, the average price for that same gallon of gasoline was $2.72. higher gas prices are tied to the jump in the price of oil. it's above $104 a barrel right now. investors are worried about supply disruption if the unrest in north africa and the middle east keeps spread iing. the fight for libya is now in its 19th day. the violence escalating every hour. rebels capture ras lanuf. but forces loyal to
. >>> and while the u.s. considers how best to react to the fighting in libya, the prices at the pump. steve handelsman reports. >> reporter: concerns about escalating warfare in libya and more air attacks against libyan civilians in what looks like a military comeback by moammar gadhafi, president obama reminded libyan generals they could be tried for war crimes. >> i want to send a very clear message to those who are around colonel gadhafi. it is their choice to make how they operate moving forward and they will be held accountable. >> reporter: mr. obama faces two choices. does he set up a no-fly zone over libya to ground gadhafi's jets? arab states say, do it, but team obama is cautious. >> any action should be the result of an international sanction. >> reporter: do something to help now argued a bush administration veteran. >> and you could provide covertly anti-aircraft and anti-tank weapons to the rebels so they can impose their own no-fly zone. >> reporter: obama choice number two, with gasoline prices averaging $3.50 a gallon and rising, crude oil prices touching $118 a barrel beca
will convene the latest hearing on islamic radicalization in the u.s. six witnesses will testify at this hearing that will be live on c-span3. three members of congress will be testifying, including one of two muslims in the congress, dingell, and frank wolf, a republican from virginia. what is your reaction to this hearing? we want to discuss it this morning on the "washington journal." as we go through the newspapers. host: we have set aside our fourth line this morning on the "washington journal" for muslims in the u.s. we will begin taking those phone calls in just a moment. first, we want to get an update on what is going on in the congress when it comes to money. here is the headline in yesterday's "washington times." "senators hail defeat of rival spending cuts." joining us on the line is david hawkins. what happened yesterday in the senate and what happens next? guest: yesterday in the senate, the senate was asked to vote on two competing versions of legislation to cut money for the rest of this fiscal year, which only last until september 30. the republican option, the b
. >> if they want him out, in the end, they may have to go get him. >> reporter: u.s. military forces are gathering in the mediterranean. two amphibious ships with 1200 marines are preparing for humanitarian missions but there are no apparent plans for the marines to go ashore. two descroirs and at least one submarine, all armed with cruise missiles, are ready to support possible no-fly zones but defense secretary gates has warned the no-fly option would require a substantial u.s. military commitment. >> let's just call a spade a spade-- a no-fly zone begins with an attack on libya. >> reporter: there's little appetite inside the administration administration for a "go it alone" attack. and while the u.n. may consider a no-fly zone there is no consensus. it seems to me that our strategy in part is we're just kind of hoping he goes away. >> well, and hope, of course, is not a strategy. >> reporter: michael sing, who worked middle east issues for the bush administration, says time is another enemy. as lib yoo veers toward a possible civil war, u.s. inaction may be seen as weakness. >> the u.s. reputa
of an air assault on libya. really the third front the u.s. is fighting on these days. it was launched by president obama to protect civilians, he said, because gadhafi's forces were bearing down on the rebels' headquarter city of benghazi. but all those cruise missiles and bombs still haven't stopped the ground fighting. the rebels were under heavy fire today about 100 miles to the south of benghazi. and as you're about to see, our own chief foreign correspondent, richard engel, was with them and got about as close as you'd ever want to. richard is back safely in benghazi tonight and is with us from there tonight. richard, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. the rebels have the will, they have the numbers, but they don't have the equipment or the discipline to take on gadhafi's forces where they're dug in, as we saw for ourselves firsthand today. the road outside benghazi today is a graveyard of gadhafi's armored vehicles, destroyed by western air strikes. after an hour and a half driving south flanked by desert, we reached the rebels' front line. there are no trenches or
the situation in libya as "unique" and said the u.s. intervened militarily to prevent a humanitarian crisis. >> it's true that america cannot use our military wherever repression occurs. and given the costs and risks of intervention, we must always measure our interests against the need for action. but that cannot be an argument for never acting on behalf of what's right. of course, there is no question that libya and the world would be better off with gadhafi out of power. i along with many other world leaders have embraced that goal. and will actively pursue it through non-military means. but broadening our military mission to include regime change would be a mistake. >> and to further that point on regime change, the president said "weapon went down that road in iraq." he also said that history is not on gadhafi's side. he says nato will assume full control of the libyan mission wednesday, and the u.s. will play a supporting role, reducing the risk and the cost of the operation. >>> the president's speech was not enough to satisfy some critics on capitol hill. house speaker john boehner
, this the morning after president obama said it would happen. watch this attack from the u.s.-led operation in the mediterranean. meanwhile, on the ground, where that tomahawk cruise missile is headed, reports from the desert that qaddafi soldiers are attacking rebel fighters with a hella machine gun and rocket fire. the lead libyan brigade, led by one of qaddafi's sons, pushing rebels away from the home town of sirte and sirte is where the battle will be joined. good morning, everybody. a lot of developments from oophnight and the morning here. welcome, i'm bill hemmer here in "america's newsroom". how you doing martha? martha: very busy. goodgood morning, bill, good morning, everybody. i'm martha maccallum. these attacks come as pentagon officials tell fox news that they are closely watching a qaddafi facility that could be storing materials to make chemical weapons and although troops are standing their ground today, there are signs that qaddafi's inner circle may be starting to crack. bill: want to go live to rick leventhal, live from ras lanuf. rick, hello. >> we're running an active c
to balance, it is literally, figuratively impossible. jenna: the gop making it clear the u.s. cannot keep wracking up debt and some saying something, if anything, needs to be stkpwhraoupb unfortunately we know republicans control one of one levers of law making, the democrats have the senate, the democrats have the white house, nobody wants to shut down the government, but one thing is nonnegotiable, as our speaker said, we will not that -- will not pass bills that to not create savings for the american people. skpwr*epb jen carl kan iron is live on this story. it seems this different on time it's different. do lawmakers sound more skeptical than before the last time of this temporary fix? >> this time you've gotand republicans alike expressing scep ti similar, this time around they are very, very apart. there have been five extensions that lawmakers have given themselves up to come up with a spending gap this year and the gaps to the two proposals is huge. the republicans have passed a measure in the house that would cut $61 billion from current spending, that is a house-passed legislati
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